CQL3 and clients for new Cluster

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CQL3 and clients for new Cluster

Matthew Langton
Hi all,

I started looking at Cassandra awhile ago and got used to the Thrift API. I put it on the back burner for awhile though until now. To get back up to speed I have read a lot of documentation at the DataStax website, and it appears that the Thrift API is no longer considered the ideal way to interface with Cassandra.

So my questions are these:

What is the future of the Thrift API, should I just ignore it going forward and use CQL?

If CQL is the preferred way to interface with Cassandra, does using any of the clients listed here: http://wiki.apache.org/cassandra/ClientOptions provide me any benefits over using a JDBC like the one listed here http://code.google.com/a/apache-extras.org/p/cassandra-jdbc/

Thanks,
Matt


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Re: CQL3 and clients for new Cluster

Hiller, Dean
Some of the Mapping libraries can help translate into objects and not have sooo much DAO code

PlayOrm has a whole feature list of things that can be helpful.  I am sure other high level clients have stuff as well that can speed up development time.
https://github.com/deanhiller/playorm#playorm-feature-list

Dean

From: Matthew Langton <[hidden email]<mailto:[hidden email]>>
Reply-To: "[hidden email]<mailto:[hidden email]>" <[hidden email]<mailto:[hidden email]>>
Date: Thursday, January 24, 2013 4:35 PM
To: "[hidden email]<mailto:[hidden email]>" <[hidden email]<mailto:[hidden email]>>
Subject: CQL3 and clients for new Cluster

Hi all,

I started looking at Cassandra awhile ago and got used to the Thrift API. I put it on the back burner for awhile though until now. To get back up to speed I have read a lot of documentation at the DataStax website, and it appears that the Thrift API is no longer considered the ideal way to interface with Cassandra.

So my questions are these:

What is the future of the Thrift API, should I just ignore it going forward and use CQL?

If CQL is the preferred way to interface with Cassandra, does using any of the clients listed here: http://wiki.apache.org/cassandra/ClientOptions provide me any benefits over using a JDBC like the one listed here http://code.google.com/a/apache-extras.org/p/cassandra-jdbc/

Thanks,
Matt


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Re: CQL3 and clients for new Cluster

Aaron Turner
In reply to this post by Matthew Langton
Either CQL or a higher level API running on top of Thrift like
Hector/Asyntax/etc.

Thrift is uh... painful.

On Thu, Jan 24, 2013 at 3:35 PM, Matthew Langton <[hidden email]> wrote:

> Hi all,
>
> I started looking at Cassandra awhile ago and got used to the Thrift API. I
> put it on the back burner for awhile though until now. To get back up to
> speed I have read a lot of documentation at the DataStax website, and it
> appears that the Thrift API is no longer considered the ideal way to
> interface with Cassandra.
>
> So my questions are these:
>
> What is the future of the Thrift API, should I just ignore it going forward
> and use CQL?
>
> If CQL is the preferred way to interface with Cassandra, does using any of
> the clients listed here: http://wiki.apache.org/cassandra/ClientOptions
> provide me any benefits over using a JDBC like the one listed here
> http://code.google.com/a/apache-extras.org/p/cassandra-jdbc/
>
> Thanks,
> Matt
>
>



--
Aaron Turner
http://synfin.net/         Twitter: @synfinatic
http://tcpreplay.synfin.net/ - Pcap editing and replay tools for Unix & Windows
Those who would give up essential Liberty, to purchase a little temporary
Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety.
    -- Benjamin Franklin
"carpe diem quam minimum credula postero"
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Re: CQL3 and clients for new Cluster

Peter Lin
I use both Thrift and CQL.

my bias take is use CQL for select queries and thrift for
insert/update. I like being able to insert exactly the data type I
want for the column name and value. CQL is more user friendly, but it
lacks the flexibility of thrift in terms of using different data types
for column names and values.

the SQL metaphor only goes so far. My bias opinion, you're not getting
the most out of Cassandra if you're only using CQL.



On Thu, Jan 24, 2013 at 6:38 PM, Aaron Turner <[hidden email]> wrote:

> Either CQL or a higher level API running on top of Thrift like
> Hector/Asyntax/etc.
>
> Thrift is uh... painful.
>
> On Thu, Jan 24, 2013 at 3:35 PM, Matthew Langton <[hidden email]> wrote:
>> Hi all,
>>
>> I started looking at Cassandra awhile ago and got used to the Thrift API. I
>> put it on the back burner for awhile though until now. To get back up to
>> speed I have read a lot of documentation at the DataStax website, and it
>> appears that the Thrift API is no longer considered the ideal way to
>> interface with Cassandra.
>>
>> So my questions are these:
>>
>> What is the future of the Thrift API, should I just ignore it going forward
>> and use CQL?
>>
>> If CQL is the preferred way to interface with Cassandra, does using any of
>> the clients listed here: http://wiki.apache.org/cassandra/ClientOptions
>> provide me any benefits over using a JDBC like the one listed here
>> http://code.google.com/a/apache-extras.org/p/cassandra-jdbc/
>>
>> Thanks,
>> Matt
>>
>>
>
>
>
> --
> Aaron Turner
> http://synfin.net/         Twitter: @synfinatic
> http://tcpreplay.synfin.net/ - Pcap editing and replay tools for Unix & Windows
> Those who would give up essential Liberty, to purchase a little temporary
> Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety.
>     -- Benjamin Franklin
> "carpe diem quam minimum credula postero"
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Re: CQL3 and clients for new Cluster

michael.figuiere@gmail.com
If your project isn't meant to go in production immediately and you want to use Cassandra 1.2+, you can give a try to DataStax' new Java driver which is available at https://github.com/datastax/java-driver
Just a snapshot for now. A 1.0 release is expected for late March, meanwhile we'll iterate over a few betas releases.

This driver has been designed to be a lightweight and efficient way to communicate with Cassandra using CQL3. It comes with a simple API, an asynchronous architecture, an efficient failover and load balancing handling.


Michaël

On Thu, Jan 24, 2013 at 4:21 PM, Peter Lin <[hidden email]> wrote:
I use both Thrift and CQL.

my bias take is use CQL for select queries and thrift for
insert/update. I like being able to insert exactly the data type I
want for the column name and value. CQL is more user friendly, but it
lacks the flexibility of thrift in terms of using different data types
for column names and values.

the SQL metaphor only goes so far. My bias opinion, you're not getting
the most out of Cassandra if you're only using CQL.



On Thu, Jan 24, 2013 at 6:38 PM, Aaron Turner <[hidden email]> wrote:
> Either CQL or a higher level API running on top of Thrift like
> Hector/Asyntax/etc.
>
> Thrift is uh... painful.
>
> On Thu, Jan 24, 2013 at 3:35 PM, Matthew Langton <[hidden email]> wrote:
>> Hi all,
>>
>> I started looking at Cassandra awhile ago and got used to the Thrift API. I
>> put it on the back burner for awhile though until now. To get back up to
>> speed I have read a lot of documentation at the DataStax website, and it
>> appears that the Thrift API is no longer considered the ideal way to
>> interface with Cassandra.
>>
>> So my questions are these:
>>
>> What is the future of the Thrift API, should I just ignore it going forward
>> and use CQL?
>>
>> If CQL is the preferred way to interface with Cassandra, does using any of
>> the clients listed here: http://wiki.apache.org/cassandra/ClientOptions
>> provide me any benefits over using a JDBC like the one listed here
>> http://code.google.com/a/apache-extras.org/p/cassandra-jdbc/
>>
>> Thanks,
>> Matt
>>
>>
>
>
>
> --
> Aaron Turner
> http://synfin.net/         Twitter: @synfinatic
> http://tcpreplay.synfin.net/ - Pcap editing and replay tools for Unix & Windows
> Those who would give up essential Liberty, to purchase a little temporary
> Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety.
>     -- Benjamin Franklin
> "carpe diem quam minimum credula postero"